Children's Dental Health

Children's Dental Health

  • Dental Visits - The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends regular dental check-ups, including a visit to the dentist within six months of the eruption of the first tooth, and no later than the child’s first birthday. Preventive care such as cleanings every six months and fluoride treatments can ensure your child has a healthy smile. The ADA also recommends the following tips for your child’s oral health:
  • Baby Bottle Tooth Decay – Do not allow your child to nurse or breast feed for long periods and don’t give a bottle with milk, juice, sweetened drinks or formula during naps or at bedtime. Encourage children to use a cup by the first birthday. Discourage frequent use of training (sippy) cups. Help your child develop good eating habits early by choosing nutritious snacks and limiting sugar.
  • Brushing and Flossing – Beginning at birth wipe your babies gums with a damp washcloth or gauze pad after every feeding to remove plaque. Start brushing your child’s teeth with water and a soft, child’s toothbrush as soon as the first tooth appears. Start flossing when two of your child’s teeth begin to touch. Brush and floss your child’s teeth daily until the children can do it by themselves. Make sure your child gets the right amount of fluoride needed in water, toothpaste or rinse.
  • Dental Sealants – Talk to you child’s dentist about sealants. A sealant is a clear or tooth colored plastic material that is applied to the chewing surface of the back teeth where cavities form most often. Sealants protect normal depressions and grooves in the teeth that are susceptible to tooth decay.
  • Mouth Guards – Any child in a recreational activity such as soccer, hockey, football, skating and bicycling should wear a mouth guard to protect the teeth in case of a fall or injury. A custom-made mouth guard from your dentist will fit the best and be most comfortable, but less expensive versions are available from sporting good stores.

Page Modified:May 18, 2012