Top 10 ways to save money

Top 10 ways to save money

Once you understand how your drug benefits work, it helps to become familiar with the drug choices that are available and appropriate for you. Prescription drug costs are one of the key factors in rising health care costs. Often, you have many choices – and many resources – to help you decide which drugs to purchase and use.

  1. Always check your Preferred Drug List. It includes generic drugs and many popular brand-name drugs. Choosing these drugs can help you save on drug costs and copays.
  2. Make a list of the drugs you take. Compare that list to the Preferred Drug List and see which brand-name drugs have generic alternatives at a lower cost.
  3. Talk to your doctor. Your doctor is your partner in achieving and maintaining good health. Show your doctor the Preferred Drug List and discuss the options appropriate for you.
  4. Ask for generic drugs. The FDA requires generics to have the same quality, strength and purity as brand-name drugs. When you use generics, you will pay less almost every time.
  5. Turn to your pharmacist. Your pharmacist can answer questions about the drugs you take – including generics -- and help you avoid any harmful drug interactions.
  6. Use a network pharmacy. Besides saving you money, network pharmacies fill your prescriptions and file the claims for you.
  7. Use home delivery. If offered in your benefit plan, you can use the convenient home delivery program to order online and receive prescriptions through the mail.
  8. Calculate your costs. Use the drug calculator tool to study all your options, compare drug costs, and find appropriate, cost-effective alternatives.
  9. Keep up with changes. Many brand drugs move off-patent over time – creating the opportunity for new generics or over-the-counter product versions.
  10. Be a smart consumer. The drug industry spends more than $3 billion on advertising each year to promote their brands, passing those costs along to you, your insurance company, and other businesses. So choose a drug based on its effectiveness – not its clever ad.

Page Modified:May 18, 2012